About our church

The village of Madingley lies four miles due west of Cambridge and is only slightly larger now than it was in the Domesday Book, with about 200 residents. The church lies just within the gates of Madingley Hall, a fine Tudor house with a modern wing behind it set in beautiful grounds, which is part of the University of Cambridge.  The church is an attractive medieval building founded over nine hundred years ago and which draws its regular congregation from the village and surrounding area, including Cambridge.

Our Priest-in-Charge is Rev'd Dr Mandy Maxwell, and our Associate Priest is Rev'd Christine Barrow.  A weekly Sunday service is held  at 11.00am (Common Worship) and is usually that of Holy Communion or occasionally Morning Prayer.  Visitors are very welcome.

The church is open during the day.  Please feel free to visit it for a service or privately at other times. You could also take time to enjoy the surroundings: some of the Hall grounds are open to the public for walking and there is a restaurant at The Three Horseshoes not far from the church.

You will find more detailed information about the church, its people, services, plans for the future, history and ways of contacting us by following the links.

Services

Services take place on Sundays at 11am. Everyone of whatever age is sure of a warm welcome. The service is usually a Eucharist in modern language, [Common Worship], with an occasional service of Morning Prayer.

News

Sermons

  • The Holy Family

    7th January 2018

    The Holy Family in their own human-ness can be a source of encouragement for us, particularly if we pay attention to Joseph and the hints we see of his own faithfulness in the midst of challenging situations.

  • Christmas Day 2017

    7th January 2018

    Presents are not always what they seem, and their “wrapping” may disguise their contents.

  • Midnight Mass 2017

    7th January 2018

    After a year in which the news produced escalating revelations of the appalling behaviour of some, and the perplexing choices made by others, what does the birth of a baby 2,000 years ago have to say to all this?